Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia

Freya Bramble-Carter is a ceramics artist based in London. Her work draws inspiration from traditional craft and celebrates the importance of connecting with the natural world. Freya has a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art and teaches pottery classes from her workshop, which she shares with father – and fellow artist – Chris Bramble.
With a BA and MA in Art History from The Courtauld Institute of Art, Pallas Kalamotusis began her career as a curator and writer. Since founding interiors studio, Studio Krokalia, Pallas has balanced history and modernity in her work, creating a wonderful aesthetic which she applies to each project.
After meeting at one of Freya’s classes and becoming friends, these two creatives decided to partner on a special project together. Turning their melting pot of ideas into a colourful collection of one-off pieces for The New Craftsmen, their union marries vibrant cultures and heritage, to joyous effect.

Ceramicist

Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia

London

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THE PROCESS

Melding their love of design, Pallas Kalamotusis (Studio Krokalia) and Freya Bramble-Carter have joined forces to envision this wonderful collection. Their vessels are first shaped in stoneware clay, expertly thrown on the wheel and assembled by Freya. After glazing using a tin white glaze, Pallas adorns the vessel, painting in colourful detail with underglaze and oxides. Each unique piece represents a journey of discovery and the duo aren't interested in making repeat replicas – the character and love in their work develops naturally and without complicated thought. The whole process is a joint venture and their collection celebrates friendship as well as creative partnership.

 

Q&A

1. What motivates you to make?

Pallas: Finding peace, joy, and a way in which to manifest your thoughts and feelings into a physical object. To create beauty, and to challenge the ideals of beauty, because making is pure creativity. There is nothing quite like having an idea and watching it turn into a real, practical, tactile thing in front of you.

Freya: It’s real life magic. Have you ever looked at what you are doing or making with your hands and thought wow, there is nothing else in this room that moves like this? Fundamentally, I’m here to spread positive thoughts and potential, to add to the expansion of us all and share the gifts that I have personally been shown. We all have a personal version of that gold dust to share.

2. What and/or who are you most inspired or influenced by?

Pallas: Ancient Greek history and culture, my family and my personal experiences. At the moment my Grandma and my dog are making waves in my process! Also, colours and forms in modernist paintings. The works of Matisse, Picasso, and Greek painters such as Nikos Ghika, and the lesser known but brilliant painters such as Nikos Nikolaou and Konstantinos Maleas. Trips to amazing places, discovering architects like Geoffrey Bawa in Sri Lanka, and honestly just everyday, everything! If Freya and I go on a walk together we end up seeing things all over the place that give us new and sometimes absurd ideas.

Freya: I must say that working with Pallas herself has hugely inspired me. The stuff that oozes out of her is very cool. She is very powerful! She can make anything happen. It’s so nice to have a female companion that is on your team in terms of inspiration, simply the two of us colliding gets the job done. I have always admired vases; the structure, the power, the beauty, the female form, the obsession, the focus, the drive, and sexuality, are all in there. Recently I have been digging out work from my school days, rediscovering the properties of Earth from an old geography case study. It is so refreshing to be submerged in nature, and clay itself, the way it can withstand millions of years of history and transformation, these are all things which inspire me.

3. What is your unique approach to your craft, and how have you honed your skills?

Freya: When I gave into my passion in my early 20s, I jumped straight in. I was heavily inspired to pass on the craft I had grown so increasingly fond of, and spent a couple of years learning how to teach in my own way. I’m interested in connection and conversation to show you – the learner, the viewer – to see what I see.

Sharing a skill with someone who is blind or showing how to make something with a few fingers, it’s a matter of sharing perspective. I am grateful to my father who taught me to be disciplined in a very easy-going way. He showed me that all I needed to do was follow my joy, and I soon understood why. Positive energy flows with ease.

Pallas: For us it's about trying, seeing what happens, and going with your gut. We don’t necessarily want to make replicas over and over or ‘refine’ our process because the character and love in our work develops naturally and without complicated thought. We welcome purity and naivety, that’s where our magic is. We make things simply because we want to. It’s a freedom to us, rather than a ‘have to get it done’ kind of approach.

4. What is your definition or proudest moment as a maker so far?.

Pallas: Most of all it’s the knowledge that people are really interested in our work and enjoy what we are making.

Freya: Asking myself that question makes me realise that the goalpost for satisfaction seems to keep moving one step further ahead. I think seeking validation from others, whether big institutions or just another person, can sometimes be dangerous for the creative process. Luckily we now have many accessible platforms who’ve helped us to move away from plinths and white walls. Though of course those are still important. I’ve had some amazing, eye opening experiences working with the Southbank Centre and the Tate, as well as other artists and businesses in the past 5 years. But mostly the best bits and proudest moments are achieved when I see the joy and follow it – like a lovely conversation whilst walking through the park, which results in an idea.

5. What is your dream project?

Pallas: We would like to make fantastic, huge pieces for an amazing female artist’s music video, where she dances around them and lives out our wildest dreams of being popstars. In the end, if she wants, she can smash them because creativity and beauty is eternal and once you have manifested it into something tactile, you can say goodbye to it and start all over again!

Freya: We have already discussed it and designed the whole set and all the ceramics in our minds together.

 

ALL PRODUCTS

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5 Products found

  1. Sea Mango Vessel
    Sea Mango Vessel
    Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia
    £800
  2. Three Wise Men Vessel
    Three Wise Men Vessel
    Out of stock
    Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia
    £960
    Out of stock
  3. Goose Rum Punch Vessel
    Goose Rum Punch Vessel
    Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia
    £960
  4. Lime Hebe Vessel
    Lime Hebe Vessel
    Out of stock
    Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia
    £800
    Out of stock
  5. Candy Berry Vessel
    Candy Berry Vessel
    Out of stock
    Freya Bramble-Carter & Studio Krokalia
    £1,040
    Out of stock
View as Grid List

5 Products found